Jan 302014
 

math

A few weeks ago, I went into Chase’s class for tutoring.

I’d emailed Chase’s teacher one evening and said, “Chase keeps telling me that this stuff you’re sending home is math – but I’m not sure I believe him. Help, please.” She emailed right back and said, “No problem! I can tutor Chase after school anytime.” And I said, “No, not him. Me. He gets it. Help me.” And that’s how I ended up standing at a chalkboard in an empty fifth grade classroom staring at rows of shapes that Chase’s teacher kept referring to as “numbers.”

I stood a little shakily at the chalkboard while Chase’s teacher sat behind me, perched on her desk, using a soothing voice to try to help me understand the “new way we teach long division.”  Luckily for me, I didn’t have to unlearn much because I never really understood the “old way we taught long division.” It took me a solid hour to complete one problem, but l could tell that Chase’s teacher liked me anyway. She used to work with NASA, so obviously we have a whole lot in common.

Afterwards, we sat for a few minutes and talked about teaching children and what a sacred trust and responsibility it is. We agreed that subjects like math and reading are the least important things that are learned in a classroom. We talked about shaping little hearts to become contributors to a larger  community – and we discussed our mutual dream that those communities might be made up of individuals who are Kind and Brave above all.

And then she told me this.

Every Friday afternoon Chase’s teacher asks her students to take out a piece of paper and write down the names of four children with whom they’d like to sit the following week. The children know that these requests may or may not be honored. She also asks the students to nominate one student whom they believe has been an exceptional classroom citizen that week. All ballots are privately submitted to her.

And every single Friday afternoon, after the students go home, Chase’s teacher takes out those slips of paper, places them in front of her and studies them. She looks for patterns.

Who is not getting requested by anyone else?

Who doesn’t even know who to request?

Who never gets noticed enough to be nominated?

Who had a million friends last week and none this week?

You see, Chase’s teacher is not looking for a new seating chart or “exceptional citizens.” Chase’s teacher is looking for lonely children. She’s looking for children who are struggling to connect with other children. She’s identifying the little ones who are falling through the cracks of the class’s social life. She is discovering whose gifts are going unnoticed by their peers. And she’s pinning down- right away- who’s being bullied and who is doing the bullying.

As a teacher, parent, and lover of all children – I think that this is the most brilliant Love Ninja strategy I have ever encountered. It’s like taking an X-ray of a classroom to see beneath the surface of things and into the hearts of students. It is like mining for gold – the gold being those little ones who need a little help – who need adults to step in and TEACH them how to make friends, how to ask others to play, how to join a group, or how to share their gifts with others. And it’s a bully deterrent because every teacher knows that bullying usually happens outside of her eyeshot –  and that often kids being bullied are too intimidated to share. But as she said – the truth comes out on those safe, private, little sheets of paper.

As Chase’s teacher explained this simple, ingenious idea – I stared at her with my mouth hanging open. “How long have you been using this system?” I said.

Ever since Columbine, she said.  Every single Friday afternoon since Columbine.

Good Lord.

This brilliant woman watched Columbine knowing that ALL VIOLENCE BEGINS WITH DISCONNECTION. All outward violence begins as inner loneliness. She watched that tragedy KNOWING that children who aren’t being noticed will eventually resort to being noticed by any means necessary.

And so she decided to start fighting violence early and often, and with the world within her reach. What Chase’s teacher is doing when she sits in her empty classroom studying those lists written with shaky 11 year old hands  - is SAVING LIVES. I am convinced of it. She is saving lives.

And what this mathematician has learned while using this system is something she really already knew: that everything – even love, even belonging – has a pattern to it. And she finds those patterns through those lists – she breaks the codes of disconnection. And then she gets lonely kids the help they need. It’s math to her. It’s MATH.

All is love- even math.  Amazing.

Chase’s teacher retires this year –  after decades of saving lives. What a way to spend a life: looking for patterns of love and loneliness. Stepping in, every single day-  and altering the trajectory of our world.

TEACH ON, WARRIORS. You are the first responders, the front line, the disconnection detectives, and the best and ONLY hope we’ve got for a better world. What you do in those classrooms when no one  is watching-  it’s our best hope.

Teachers- you’ve got a million parents behind you whispering together: “We don’t care about the damn standardized tests. We only care that you teach our children to be Brave and Kind. And we thank you. We thank you for saving lives.”

Love – All of Us



Carry On, Warrior
Author of the New York Times Bestselling Memoir CARRY ON, WARRIOR
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  1,626 Responses to “Share This With All the Schools, Please”

  1. I believe our children see their schools as Godless places because too many parents are telling their children, they are taking God out of our schools. Have you ever thought about how your kids might see this? Are you promoting the idea that God is weak and our schools, our government, and our nation has power over him. The image is evil being in control.
    Our Children should never be told, they can’t pray in school. School is rough on kids in many ways. It’s a comfort to some to believe they can pray, anytime they want or need to talk with him.

    If we love God, why are we teaching our children about a God that is so weak man controls where he is allowed to exist. We should be teaching our children that we serve an ALL POWERFUL GOD -that cannot be put out of anything as long as he is in the hearts of the people GOD is there!

    The teacher that inspired me most never said a word about church or God. The way she treated every student and made each feel good about who they were; taught us more about the true God than a thousand public prayers.

    This woman inspired me to become a teacher. I’m retired now and my fifth grade teacher left this world a long time ago but her influence lives on. I now hear it in statements made by some of my students, (adult now, but still Facebook friends).. God & Goodness never perishes it’s life and energy itself. You don’t have to believe at all, you just have to believe in the children, even ones that feel they are hopeless.

    • Children are allowed to pray anytime they’d like. No one is trying to take away that religious freedom. It’s the prayer lead by a teacher or administrator that shouldn’t happen. If it’s a public school, there should not be any mandated prayer, period. Religion should be taught in a religion class and that’s it. Your child can pray all day long if they so choose. People misunderstand when they hear “taking god out of schools.” He was never there to begin, nor should he be. If you allow your version of god to be mandated, then every person of every faith will want the same thing. Separation of church and state is a good thing and I can’t understand why some people choose not to understand it that way. Teach your child religion and faith at home and church, and religious facts in a religion class. Simple.

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  3. I am a School Social Worker in Illinois, specifically a community 30 miles south of Chicago, that is in complete poverty. Prior to this assignment, I was in a suburb, west of the city, where poverty was not a concern. I value teachers more then you know. It is my job to come into the classroom to provide Social/Emotional lessons, as well as individual counseling. Until my profession is valued, there will be more of “crisis intervention” then “prevention.” It is the teachers job to teach, and the SW’s job to promote social/emotional curriculum. Teachers can’t do it all. It is not fair, and it is not their “true” responsibility. When a whole team of professionals work together, we can get the job done. There is a lack of SW’s in schools….sometimes one for every 800 kids. Kids today, all kids, and not just Special Ed kids, need support from the School Social Workers.

  4. Ajijah has hit at least one nail on the head! (posted on Feb. 14) Did you know that other countries DO NOT count their special needs kids into their national numbers? They do it the way Ajijah stated – in the eighth grade all students are tested and it is determined then if the student goes into an advanced academic/regular academic or trade/vocational school. And the numbers they put out on their countries websites only reflect the ones that will continue in academics. Not the ones going on to trade schools and especially not the special education kids with the really low scores. Our schools have to test all their students and all of the scores count for or against the school, the district, the state and ultimately our national rankings in education.

    Our country has sold our children a bill of goods that is wrong and used biased statistics from other countries to scare parents into believing that our children are stupid and the teachers are not teaching. Our country has done a grave disservice to our chilren – making good teachers change their methods so all can pass the test, making students test EVERY year – but stacking the deck because our numbers will never be equal to other countries because the demographics of who is being counted will never be the same.

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  9. I have read your comments and believe that teachers have a responsibility to not only to teach the basics but to instill in each member of their class an understanding that if they offer each other respect and kindness, they will receive it back. Helping each other feels good, and there are schools that teach that very thing. Teachers have a responsibility to share and learn from each all philosophies that are used in all schools.
    Did you know:
    The Waldorf School of Garden City is an independent, coeducational, college-preparatory day school for students age three through twelfth grade.
    The Waldorf Schools educate children to meet the world with purpose, gratitude and respect.
    “Our curriculum, inspired by Rudolf Steiner, progresses in accordance with child development, awakening students to the experience of knowledge, strengthening their sense of moral responsibility, and empowering them to act with courage and conviction.”
    The school’s aim is to graduate a diverse group of young men and women distinguished by the scope and acuity of their minds as well as the depth and integrity of their character.
    Founded in 1947, their philosophy is based on the values of imagination, integrity, hard work, kindness, personal and social responsibility, and mutual respect. They provide a rigorous, liberal arts education that focuses on the development of the whole human being. Emphasis is placed on a multidisciplinary approach to learning through a curriculum that balances the physical, artistic, social and intellectual needs of our students. With a nurturing environment and diverse community students are enabled to excel as educated and compassionate individuals whose lives are enriched by their lifelong passion for learning. Consider sharing this with others.

    • Waldorf = school for rich kids.

      • Waldorf is not necessarily for rich kids. When I was in grad school 1994-96 to get my teaching degree, I learned of a project to convert failing schools in one of our inner cities to Waldorf supported by the same amount of tax money. I don’t recall the city, but education officials there had tried everything and Waldorf worked. That didn’t surprise those of us “in the field” studying and observing so many schools during our two years. Also, many of us who are not Waldorf teachers use Waldorf methods in the public schools.

        • $10k for PREESCHOOL and $23k for k-12 grade is rediculous ! It’s great the government felt the need to pay the schools tuition as a special interest project as crazy priced as it is, . Even if there is an endowment that helps families pay some of that it’s almost double the cost of even prep school where I live. That’s crazy everyday people can’t afford that! Look at the Newsday article the school is written about on March 22nd of this year where they published the tuition… Use of these methods is commendable, as are those of Maria Montessori,and Boys Town but they don’t cost that much to implement and any parent of a Montessori student can effectively communicate the methods used there. It’s a shame that public schools can’t just agree to use proven methods like those. :(

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  11. Hi Glennon,

    This is beautiful. Once you’ve identified the lonely children, you can easily match them up with the children who are leaders in your class and create change.
    One day my son told me a story about a child , let’s call him John, that everyone always ‘pushes away’, that is never invited to participate. I was very upset to hear this and decided to challenge him to look for opportunities to include John, pick him first for the team, ask him to be his partner. It’s been three months and my son has made progress. Not only am I helping John through my child, but I am empowering my child to be a leader, to look for opportunities to be great, to do what others won’t do. If we could all teach our children to be inclusive, it would be a better world.

  12. Amazing. What an amazing teacher and person. How blessed those children are. And thanks for sharing with others. So beautiful.

  13. While the gist of the article is phenomenal, I’m left with one rather disparaging question. What does/can she do with the information that she collects? I have been teaching for quite some time. I find talking with counselors is like talking to a wall. They seem to be overworked, understaffed, and fearful of any liability to the school district. This isn’t just my school district that I currently teach, but several that I have taught at.

    Also, tragically, when I identified one stood who was “disconnected”, I felt it prudent to talk with the parents. We had what I thought was a really positive meeting with the teachers, counselors, principal, and parents. Only to find out days later, it was the parents that were making this poor child the way he was. The parents put on such a good act.

    One can talk with the children affected, but this can make a bully wiser and harder to catch because they know you are “on to them”. It can also make the one being bullied more reluctant to speak out next time because you talking with the bully and the bullied made things worse.

    Yes, bullying is a major problem. The article addresses how to identify it. This is a great start. My question, what did this particular teacher finally do with the information when she got it. That’s truly the article I would like to read.

    • It seems to me that she ought to have introduced the child to another , and suggested they be friends; that they play together at recess; that they work together on a class project. The teacher must hopefully have set many interactive – connecting activities into focus. Music, art, DRAMA – - social skills training are all coming to the fore in teaching again. Thank God

      • The last time i taught was in a school with highly professional and vocal parents. The principal didn’t allow us to teach those topics or skills because it took time from testable ones. To increase test scores we were so busy with new training toward that end, we were too busy to allow time for humane topics. In Seattle Schools those teachers with low test scores were forced out. I felt like I was teaching robots because I couldn’t teach students as humans. And no, I’m not teaching anymore. Sad, because that’s why I went into teaching in the first place.
        I think I initially wanted to teach because in the fourth grade I had a teacher whom I felt didn’t like me. I loved the s r a books but I read them all too early. In addition, my mom was depressed and I felt so invisable. I teased a new girl at recess and the teacher called my mom. Of course, my mom treated me with disdain so I felt worse. The strip of paper are great because they circumvent poor parents. When my own sons mentioned kids whom they felt were ignored, I asked them if they wanted to invite them over to play they always said yes and the kids became good friends in and out of school. Yahoo to you for pubicly bringing the heart back into teaching!

    • I thought the same thing. I’m sure she could definitely gather and sort the information, although anonymous, based upon the child/children never mentioned. But then, what was the follow-through? This is such a good piece of information and I will be passing this along!

    • I believe that everything we develop into starts in the home…or in the lack of a home.
      “Children are the only known substance with which responsible adults can be made” (Author unknown)

      I know, from my own experience, that just having a teacher show that they care, can sometimes be ‘enough’ to start a child on the right track. You don’t have to be perfect yourself, but give the child a taste of the good that IS in the world.

      • I hurt very much throughout middle school, feeling like I had no true, loyal friends. My music teacher really showed an interest in me and it meant everything to me during that hard time. I’m not sure if she had any idea what I was going through or what she meant to me, but I had occasion to meet her as an adult, and made sure to express my profound sense of gratefulness.

        • I am so glad that you were able to express your thanks to your music teacher later in life. It must have meant a lot to herl

    • I am going to assume that she might have changed seats around to have the “lonely” kids sit with others that she knows might be good for them? Or perhaps she would try to acknowledge those that aren’t nominated just so that they know someone cares?

  14. This is a teacher who went into her profession because she loved children….and proved by her actions…we will never know how many lives she saved….God bless!!!!

  15. THIS WAS A TEACHER WHO WENT INTO THE PROFESSION BECAUSE SHE LOVED CHILDREN…AND PROVED IT….WHAT A TOUCHING STORY…WE WILL NEVER KNOW HOW MANY LIVES SHE SAVED…GOD BLESS!!!

  16. Thanks for finally talking about > Share This With All the Schools, Please
    | Momastery < Liked it!

  17. What a nice story. The other comments were very revealing, too…what a commentary on the state of our profession.
    Personally, I was glad the writer didn’t spoon feed us with instructions about how to use this information. Our business is far too “cookie cutter” as it is! We are all unique people, and the dynamics in our classrooms are all unique. I think there are a million creative interventions that could result from this exercise…which we can each discover for ourselves if we simply take the time to creatively reflect.
    To Greta: I hope you have an awesome and rewarding day!

    • Great story that I am passing on to my school.
      Thankyou

    • I love your comment Jo. Yes, cookie cutter is not the answer, but I think a structure can be helpful. I’ll bet that this lovely woman trusts her intuition and does something slightly different each time. We are individual. Kids are individual. When we are clear and stand in a place of love, I believe we know how to serve.

  18. Hello, I had a friend share your information on her facebook page and I copied it down and posted it on my blog. It really moved me. I hope that’s okay with you. If not, just send me an email and I’ll take it down. I also posted the link to your blog and gave you credit for the post. Thanks in advance. This is an awesome story!

  19. while I find this article overall a sweet reflection of what good teachers offer our children … the sentence “We agreed that subjects like math and reading are the least important things that are learned in a classroom.” bothers me… first, for the simple reason that ultimately what teachers are there for is to teach our children skills they use for the rest of their lives to obtain jobs, enter into contracts etc. Without these skills, they will be lost to poverty. But, more ironically, she uses these “least important” skills to see deeper into the emotional make up of her kids. By reading the little slips of paper and using math to calculate patterns. So, if her childhood teachers had taken the stance that reading and math were least important and only concerned themselves with the emotional state of the kids… well, perhaps she wouldn’t have been skilled enough to have even become a teacher. Again, I’m not slamming the article or her desire to assist kids with the emotional side of life, it is as noble as this article points out. However, to bash reading and math as unimportant or least important, I think does a disservice to the entire teaching profession as these are more important to a life long healthy life than temporary classroom standings. Most students have experienced being bullied, being left out or even being the smarty pants of the classroom, ultimately, for most students… these have no impact on the remainder of their lives. But, not knowing how to read or work out math problems will have a huge impact on the remainder of their lives. I believe a good teacher can do both.. now perhaps that comment was trivial to some, but, I think it points out what is wrong with education today. We are expecting teachers to teach emotional balance rather than reading, writing, and arithmetic. We wonder why American schools are dropping in standing compared to the rest of the world… this is why. I’m not saying they should ignore the emotional… as they face it everyday in their classrooms and it affects how students learn. But, lets not forget or diminish what the ultimate goal of teaching, a child who is able to read, write and calculate math problems.

    • She didn’t “bash reading and math”. And there was no talk about teachers “teaching emotional balance”. Did you even read the article?

      It’s about keeping children invested in the classroom – a child who is disconnected from his or her peers is not likely to be interested in learning anything. You can’t teach a child who doesn’t want to learn. I disagree that being bullied has “no impact on the remainder of their lives”….a number of interviews have shown that it does have detrimental impact on the emotional lives of students, often for a long period of time afterwards.

      She is also largely addressing the need to reduce school violence. Are you aware that there have been 44 school shootings since Newtown? 44! If I was a teacher in school today, I’d be darn concerned about avoiding school violence. A bullet-proof vest wouldn’t be a bad investment either.

      • Well said.

      • Amen.

      • In the last part of this wonderful article it states: “We don’t care about the damn standardized tests. We only care that you teach our children to be Brave and Kind.” But that isn’t true. I do care about the standardized tests and I do care about each child’s emotional well being as well. So I do not disagree with what Vtiff posted nor do I disagree with you. Not only have there been 44 shootings since Newton but there have been 100′s of shootings before Newton and possibly this teacher has found a critical clue to help reduce that number but we cannot “not care about standardized testing”. Both are important in the future of our students.

    • Did you read that at all? A child who is not connected is not learning math or reading. My daughter has kids like this in her classroom. I’ve seen these kids, the 12-year-old who can’t read. He is neglected at home, and rejected at school, and he is on a scary path. I’ve talked with him, and spent time with him, and even looked at some artwork he shared. This kid is obsessed with violence, and I’m sort of relieved that my daughter won’t be in school with him next year. He won’t learn. He’ll continue to be an underachiever, until he finally gives up on the school system, and drops out. So yes, reading and math are the least important skills. And bullying has a huge impact on kids, or have you not heard all the many news stories about young people committing suicide over bullying? Are you even a parent, because you really have no clue.

      • Good reply, Charm. Except you had to take that little stab at the end. Are you even a HUMAN, because YOU really have no clue.

    • When I was in high school, I was shy, kept to myself, and drew during classes. Most teachers told me to stop, or they would get irritated that I’d be drawing instead of listening to them (when in fact the opposite was true, drawing helped me focus). I had an English teacher that decided that instead of getting upset, she’d encourage that. She switched up the curriculum so that instead of writing book reports we could give a visual presentations instead, which included different mediums: food related to the book, artwork of all mediums, and if you didn’t like presenting you could write a long paper (So most kids tapped their creative talents). Anyway, what I’m getting at is that having a teacher encourage me to draw while she was talking and complimenting my artwork instead of ignoring me or getting upset made a bigger difference in my life than grammatical sentence structure ever did. I went on to become a relatively successful graphic designer/illustrator because I had her encouraging me to get into art college instead of telling me to grow up. Sometimes, the biggest thing that can impact a student isn’t what’s being taught from the lesson plan.

      • Lovely Tiffany, I am glad that things worked out for you in the end. I like your comment “Sometimes, the biggest thing that can impact a student isn’t what’s being taught from the lesson plan.” Bless you.

    • I find the ultimate goal of teaching is to teach kids to think and to become contributors. Some kids will better at math than reading and writing. Some will be strong readers and writers. But the individual skills are less important than the ability to think, navigate and solve problems and communicate with others.

      I’m hoping that what this brilliant math teacher does with the information she collects is provide opportunities for kids to excel and therefore be recognized and noticed by their peers. Helping to create opportunities for those kids to experience success will help develop some confidence which will create a cycle opposite the negative cycle caused by apathy and helplessness. Kudos to this very smart lady. No doubt she will be a loss felt by students and teachers.

    • Without emotionally stable children and a culture in the schools that promotes these type of activities the kids will not even have a chance to learn math and reading. I can promise that the environment she established in her class has lead to better learning across the board. This is true for kids in class and adults at work.

    • I honestly don’t think the writer meant math/reading were unimportant literally… I believe it’s being used to demonstrate that although this is the reason why they are there, to learn these skills, there is a much more important skill, that left unattended could ultimately make the learning of these more important skills, take a backseat. If the things that she discovers from the little papers are left to ‘fix’ themselves, most often these small social issues will deeply affect the learning process of our children. I’d rather my child get their seat changed, or have a little push to find new friends, (to study with?) than have underlying issues that upset them to the point that they’re, angry, doing drugs, committing suicide and killing other people. On a whole I think this woman saved/saves lives, she did what she believed was not only helpful at that moment, but for the future to come. Wonder how many of these children have not turned to drugs or picked up a gun because of this…I have to say that I, personally, think what she’s done/doing is commendable, it’s brave, it’s smart and it costs us not a thing. It’s a good thing.

    • vtiff said exactly what I was thinking! You are right on the money! I like what Tony said too – except that I don’t want them teaching only things that will be on the test but actually learning and the testing showing what they’ve learned – nothing was said about mainstreaming kids which is a real problem when they have to pay attention to kids with so many emotional and physical problems that they can’t teach the other kids reading – writing and math

  20. This sounds wonderful. What did the teacher do to make the situation better for these children, once they have been identified? What methods did she use that worked and helped them make friends and feel included? This would be the information that should be shared with everyone.

  21. Big deal. What a load of hyper emotional crap. Anyone can pick a lonely kid or a bully or isolated kid within 5 minutes of meeting them. It’s how the teacher turns those kids around to stop them feeling isolated is where we should recognise her merits as a teacher. Not a bunch of lists. There is no way that she is stopping a mass murderer from emerging. That takes a whole community over a whole lifetime.

    • You’re very negative. You assume she doesn’t do anything with the lists and the information gleaned from them. While the story does’t give details of the exact actions she takes the story does say she acts on it.

      • But the actions are what we can all learn from. To celebrate someone who apparently can identify the ‘disconnected” is very shallow. Every teacher can do that – it is how they reconnect them is far more inspiring. This article puts too much emphasis on a teacher who thinks she is god’s gifts to teachers because she has worked out that there are disconnected kids in her classroom. It’s an overemotional, shallow, and pointless article that doesn’t help anyone else in the teaching industry help other students in their own schools. Time for this teacher and the author of this article to grow up and act like a professional.

        • Wow, Greta…what happened to you? I was bullied, have a learning disability and was terminally shy, for the longest time. When I teacher, in today’s system, goes beyond the basic…I’m impressed. To call the article “shallow” is beyond disconnected to the true sentiment. If you don’t like something…guess what? You don’t have to read or follow the author. Insulting them by telling them to grow up is more of a self-reflection, don’t you think?

        • I think you are the one who is shallow – never mind the positive things this article has to offer , lets jump up and have a hoo – haa because I have nothing better to do. You’re out of it. What about – each and every individual or child in need of attention requires a different medication – there isn’t a one-stop solution. Only the teacher will know and understand how to make the appropriate change – use your RORO.

        • Greta,I am a teacher. I do pay attention to my students beyond their test scores. As the year goes on in my full classroom, I am continually noticing things about students that I did not the first week. I then direct a little more of my attention and also other students in subtle ways to be more inclusive.
          I do not hear the teacher bragging about herself. It is the parent thanking her and I thank them both for inspiring me to continue doing what I do.

    • Dear Greta, From your response i can only assume you have never taught – or never taught a classroom, or more than one class at a time, or a class with more than 5 kids in it. Teachers have a LOT of things to do and kids do fall through the cracks even with the best of intentions. Also, what kids do in class and how they behave to each other out of class can be very different. So yes, this teacher’s system is rather brilliant, to monitor the lonely left behind kids,
      And IMHO, if you think “emotional crap” hyper or otherwise shouldn’t be part of education, you shouldn’t come anywhere near education. Education isn’t only about teaching content and skills – its also about caring for people; and that my friend is a pretty emotional thing.

    • Compassion and consideration are supposed to be cornerstones of any professional teaching strategy, maybe Greta had one too many bad experiences………….!

      I think it is a lovely item, but wish that a follow-up, e.g. what does she do when she identifies a lonely, unhappy student?

    • Greta.

      Either your not a teacher or a parent, maybe neither by the sounds of things.
      What this teacher did was inspirational. It was her list, whatever this comprises of, it was the list that was part of her math pattern, which without it, she would not have been able to identify those who needed her help.
      She also used her time to discover this, which some teachers don’t give up their own time to help their students in need. So yea, good on her in what she has done, it is obvious that you are not a woman who would go out of your way, to help anyone but yourself. Hmmm!! Now to me, it sounds like you maybe a bully too, when you should know better. When I was younger, I was one one who used to get bullied and it went unrecognized, fortunately, I did not get to the point where I felt suicidal, I was one of the very few lucky ones, so yes I can see where this teacher is going with what she did, I just wished there was more positive in people than there was negative. And boy don’t you just give off negative vibes, try and be a little positive for once, as nobody likes negative people. If you don’t like what this teacher has done or how she has gone about it, then don’t follow the post or at least keep your negative thoughts to yourself, nobody wants to hear folks whining. Rant over.

  22. I would like to start implementing this in my classroom. I understand most of this. However, how does she figure out who the bullies are?

    • My guess is that the bullies could be the kids who get too much attention at first and then begin to lose it. Whether or not she can identify bullies using the paper method, she can know to be more aware of the relationships in the classroom based on children’s answers.

    • My thought is that after awhile the kids share more than just names of who they want to sit by and maybe the choices the kids make on the best classroom citizen show a pattern and tell her why some kids are not chosen.

  23. Amazing. Amazing. Amazing.

  24. t is one amazing teacher!!! I applaud her efforts and I’m glad this mother has acknowledged her. However I disagree with the author on one critical point found in her last two paragraphs. Unarguably teachers can have a lasting impression on our children. However, ultimately it is our responsibility as parents to shape character, to model, teach and instill good morals, values and principles in our children. Our teachers have a big enough challenge as it stands to educate our children. We cannot expect them to also assume the responsibilities of parents. The family is the most fundamental unit of society and there is no substitute for good parenting. Ultimately it is the teaching and rearing that happens within our homes that most influences our communities. What is the saying? The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world. So while I’m grateful for good teachers who REINFORCE the good that is taught in my home. I accept that it is MY responsibility to teach my children to be kind and brave and would suggest that PARENTS are the first line of defense. Unfortunately too many parents today would like to pass their responsibility on to others. No nanny, daycare or teacher, even the best Sunday school teacher, can ever make up for what should be taught in the home, by dedicated, loving and involved parents.

    • Mother of 5, you rock!, along with Chase´s brilliant teacher! Totally agree with you. I am blessed to have grown up in a family-oriented community and to have passed that on to my wonderful kids. There´s no substitute for good parenting and dedicated teaching, period.

  25. This is my first time pay a quick visit at here and i am actually happy to read all at one place.

  26. This is a very nice list of do follow blogs.This is exactly what I was looking for. It’s really very useful for me. Thank you.

  27. AMEN. Let’s get back to basics with the children we teach. What’s the point with knowledge if they don’t know how to think for themselves????

    • I so agree with you BJ! Everything is emotion nowadays! Knowledge and being able to think for yourself would go along way to fixing many problems!

  28. This is really nice and good blog it is really amazing and useful.

  29. I completely agree with Ajija’s last paragraph . Added to this, teachers are given more students than one can handle in a 40 minute period. Corrections of notebooks and other test papers become a big burden.

  30. Hello, i think that i saw you visited my weblog so i came to “return the favor”.I’m trying to find things
    to improve my website!I suppose its ok to use some of your ideas!!

  31. Enough blame to go around. Plenty for everyone. The teacher in this article develop a beautiful idea and implements it in her classroom. It appears to be a positive experience and moves individuals in a positive direction. If we can all, kids or no kids, forgo blame and pitch in anyway we know how to make life better for any reason, it has a ripple effect-little then big. The world, the earth becomes a better planet to live on. We are the majority. Let’s take it back!

  32. Beautiful. That’s why I went into teaching in the first place, and will hopefully always remain the reason I stay in it, even when times are tough, and educational trends come & go!!!!! Can I hear an AMEN from the rest of the teachers out there?

  33. Amazing! It makes me proud to be a teacher.

  34. Everything is very open with a very clear description of the issues.
    It was definitely informative. Your website is very useful.
    Many thanks for sharing!

  35. I love this teacher’s unique plan for discovering what was in the heart of each child. Many of us are trying to show character and love to children where we are. The school system in our country is broken for sure but it’s not going away any time soon. I homeschool my children and am able build their character little by little every day but many can’t, don’t know how or are unwilling to do so. Thank God for the teachers who can stand up for those children. They are the future too and will have jobs someday along with my kids. We need to show children God’s love wherever we can and not pin blame on the parents. They need love as well.

  36. I like what the teacher is doing and the motives behind it, my only issue is this…

    If the primary purpose of school is to encourage friendship and community…. Why are we doing school at all? If the teacher’s cheif concern is teaching courage and friendship then we’ve got something very backwards. Surely it would be a much easier (and more appropriate job) of the parent to teach character and community than a complete stranger? That’s not at all to say teacher’s shouldn’t try to teach those things – it’s saying that the system itself is one that is broken.

    We clamor for community and allegiance between our children when we put them in cells for 8 hours a day with kids of the exact same age and, a lot of the time, socioeconomic background. We expect ‘tolerance’ and interconnectedness when one of the principal things schools and especailly now social media teach is aloneness.

    Communities were never originially build around a school. Character wasn’t learned by Miss Smith but by mom and dad. If we’re clamoring for those things – for character and community – we need to realize that schools themselves are one of the chief stumbling blocks in their way.

    • It doesn’t help when mom and dad don’t know how to teach character. Maybe mom and dad should be the ones going to school to learn how to teach their own children. Also, communities were originally built around the churches-which often acted as the schools as well. Maybe our participation in religion and faith, and understanding the teachings of God are the key to developing children into loving and righteous individuals.

      Food for thought

      • I agree with the fact children are not born with character..it must be taught…in fact – it must be “hammered and forged”. There are so many “negatives” out there…it amazes me that only a handful of schools only teach the 3-R’s (readin’, ritin’ and rithmatic”) – isn’t it time that Respect and Responsibility become part of the core curriculum?

      • But what was her response to the study? What changes does she see when seat assignments are changed. If none of the children ever got moved from their previous seating assignment from week to week, then they would become self-conscious simply from never moving. She becomes a catalyst for the kids’ own lack of self-worth.

        So how the heck would she “pin-down” a bully-kid as opposed to simply the “less-popular kid” from several students saying they wouldn’t wish to sit beside that kid? Or even more obvious if many darker-skinned kids continuously never mentioned the lighter-skinned kids, or blondes from brunettes or boys never writing down girls names. There are dozens of combinations and reasons for kids to write down names regardless of the instructions.

        Heart-warming as the story is, I can’t see it having more merit of resolving an issue than it might be simply misdirecting a teacher’s intended side-line goal of world peace among children.

        If the teacher was so astounding, you mean to say that she didn’t wish to have her name known? IF there were positive results (not just positive intentions) then she should be praised and the system implemented in other schools. Again, a heart-warming story but moreso suspiciously vague. We often create stories to purport our own opinions or fill pages in books, so if there is any doubt or wrong, then we’re not to blame, it’s simply “Chase’s teacher” that’s the focus.

        Regardless, I would facetiously suggest to survey the kids about their parents instead. Then send surveys home to the parents to take. Have a mandatory school to teach the parents to instill confidence in their child. Kids just reflect the stress, ignorance, indignation or uncaring attitudes of the parents gained in the first 6 years before school even starts.

        “Teach your parents well. Their children’s hell will slowly go by”

        Teach the parents and the child will handle their peers on their own as a residual outcome of having self-worth from an early age.

    • I think you’re missing the point. This isn’t an either/or situation. It’s not either “Ms. Math Teacher” OR the parents teach character, but rather both. You’re right, kids spend so much time with us that as the year goes along, they become our children, and we want our children to grow up to be responsible young adults, then productive members of society. And contrary to your opinion, kids aren’t always in the same socioeconomic situation as their classmates. Situations vary wildly, even in private schools. But once those doors close, they belong to me, and I want my kids to learn to be good people. I pick up the lesson where the parents left off. We work together.

    • Well that is for sure the truth: our school systems are not what they used to be. Not only is the education outdated, our government (while teaching what a great country we are) keeps cutting the budget for schools. Teachers, who make the most difference and get paid the least, are being fired every day. We pride our country on being so advanced and yet there is less and less money for schools and curriculas are curtailed to compete with other countries. It’s sad and it has to change

    • I did not get the impression this teacher ONLY focused on this method of teaching kindness and acceptance. The notes were done once a week. They were not discussed with her class. She studied them and made her own decision. I am sure the rest of her week was spent educating her students in their core studies. As the parent of a daughter who was left out and lonely, I applaud the thoughtful, loving and discreet way this teacher tries to avoid that hurt and loneliness that plagues many children today!

    • First, schools suffer from a lack of funding, due to voter concerns that the revenues will never reach the classroom, teachers, or students; but rather, the money will go to expand or financially reward the administrative structure. The average voter is more than willing to send more dollars to the schools, provided there are clear and definitive guidelines as to who will get this money and how the money will be spent.
      Secondly, the real issue facing most teachers is really best defined as a “Crisis in Parenting”. Many parents are simply no longer disciplining their children, as well as no longer teaching values that allow them to be adding to, rather than, subtracting from society. Research as recent as 2005 shows that teachers spend 50% of classroom time teaching, and the other 50% dealing with behavior issues that disrupt the learning environment. However, when a school or teacher does enforce the rules, most parents come in to berate the teacher and/or principal, rather than apologize for their child’s behavior, and then follow through with home-based correction/instruction. In our age ov Cultural Relativism, where, “what I think is right is right”, why are so many perplexed by this outcome?
      Thirdly, exposure to a variety of cultures and socio-ecomonic backgrounds is also something some people call “world travel”. So this is great for students and hopefully teaches tolerance and respect for differences. However, a huge deterrent to this is children who come from homes where the expectation is “I’m owed (x, y, or z), chicken raised with racist attitudes (yes, they are still present), or children who suffer from abuse and mental disorders.
      Fourthly, we are over-medicating our children with drugs whose long- term effects are yet to be understood. Why? Because it’s easier to give a child q pill, than to spend the time and resources necessary to help the child.
      Fifth, like it or not, your children are soon to be primarily educated by computer programs, which much more accurately track progress, actual skill levels, and off- task time. The teacher will act as moderator/helper, while the computer does the teaching. Then, based on computer results, the child will be “tracked” into advanced academics, regular academics, or trade school, much as happens in several countries already. And, if you have a complaint, you will most likely talk to a computer, which will logically and objectively explain why your child is being reprimanded or disciplined.
      Lastly, teachers, such as the one in this article, and the ones I’ve seen at work, and who helped shape and guide my own life are rare gems and are disappearing. Why? Because they are exhausted with trying to teach your children how to behave, while simultaneously trying to teach academics; and tired of being berated and meetings where the child’s bad behavior is defended by the parent(s)/guardian. Schools aren’t broken, but they are changing due to a severe lack of proper social skills in students of all ages. 99% of all educators are “heroes”, who exhaust themselves trying to make a difference in the lives of student’s. The other 1% are just too burnt-out to continue teaching effectively, or are unable to handle the immense demands of the modern classroom. Parents, start doing your job at home, and quit expecting an institution to do it for you!

      • To me, one of the saddest problems is the lack of parenting skills. Becoming a parent takes more than birthing the child. I wish every parent-to-be had the time and money to take classes to learn this skills. But not all parents have this ability. Why? some are too young and some others are so busy having to work to try to support their families, which makes this almost impossible.

        Social issues are always rising their ugly heads from lack of funding. Weather the lack of funds is from poor voting habits or too much politicking to where the funds goes, I’m just not sure.

    • First, schools suffer from a lack of funding, due to voter concerns that the revenues will never reach the classroom, teachers, or students; but rather, the money will go to expand or financially reward the administrative structure. The average voter is more than willing to send more dollars to the schools, provided there are clear and definitive guidelines as to who will get this money and how the money will be spent.
      Secondly, the real issue facing most teachers is really best defined as a “Crisis in Parenting”. Many parents are simply no longer disciplining their children, as well as no longer teaching values that allow them to be adding to, rather than, subtracting from society. Research as recent as 2005 shows that teachers spend 50% of classroom time teaching, and the other 50% dealing with behavior issues that disrupt the learning environment. However, when a school or teacher does enforce the rules, most parents come in to berate the teacher and/or principal, rather than apologize for their child’s behavior, and then follow through with home-based correction/instruction. In our age of Cultural Relativism, where, “what I think is right is right”, why are so many perplexed by this outcome?
      Thirdly, exposure to a variety of cultures and socio-ecomonic backgrounds is also something some people call “world travel”. So this is great for students and hopefully teaches tolerance and respect for differences. However, a huge deterrent to this is children who come from homes where the expectation is “I’m owed (x, y, or z), children raised with racist attitudes (yes, they are still present), or children who suffer from abuse and mental disorders.
      Fourthly, we are over-medicating our children with drugs whose long- term effects are yet to be understood. Why? Because it’s easier to give a child q pill, than to spend the time and resources necessary to help the child.
      Fifth, like it or not, your children are soon to be primarily educated by computer programs, which much more accurately track progress, actual skill levels, and off- task time. The teacher will act as moderator/helper, while the computer does the teaching. Then, based on computer results, the child will be “tracked” into advanced academics, regular academics, or trade school, much as happens in several countries already. And, if you have a complaint, you will most likely talk to a computer, which will logically and objectively explain why your child is being reprimanded or disciplined.
      Lastly, teachers, such as the one in this article, and the ones I’ve seen at work, and who helped shape and guide my own life are rare gems and are disappearing. Why? Because they are exhausted with trying to teach your children how to behave, while simultaneously trying to teach academics; and tired of being berated and meetings where the child’s bad behavior is defended by the parent(s)/guardian. Schools aren’t broken, but they are changing due to a severe lack of proper social skills in students of all ages. 99% of all educators are “heroes”, who exhaust themselves trying to make a difference in the lives of student’s. The other 1% are just too burnt-out to continue teaching effectively, or are unable to handle the immense demands of the modern classroom. Parents, start doing your job at home, and quit expecting an institution to do it for you!

    • Parents don’t/can’t “teach” character and community other than by example. Sometimes the example is wrong or misinterpreted. Caring “complete strangers” are needed to show that there are alternatives. I am happy to know there are a few still around.

  37. This was truly amazing and inspiring to read. I’m a teacher and I love this idea, I don’t know if it’s possible but I would really love more details of her classroom and seating chart I wanna try this. A ny way I can get more details?

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